Take Care of Your Tools

There were several times on the road when I was reminded of my Yankee side — that part of me that takes a hard look at things, tells you to own up when you screw up. And I had one Yankee moment on the trail up to the Svartifoss waterfall.

Early on, I came to a bridge over a creek. I took the place in: a rushing stream, red-brown bramble lining the banks, rain clouds above. Of course I had to shoot it.

By now, I was under the bridge, close to the water. A wide angle was the choice, i.e. my 16-35mm that no longer had a cap. I looked the glass over as I screwed the lens in place.

My slip of a hand on that cold day was still a bother. It was an easy mistake that had non-trivial consequences. This two week shoot was important to me, as business and as creative opportunity. I’ve planned it up the kazoo. And this essential lens could easily get damaged given the spring conditions. Plus I hadn’t heard of a single store on the Ring Road that would have DSLR lens caps. (I found one a week later up in Akureyri.)

Point taken. I got my head back into photographing the little stream.

On path to Svartifoss waterfall, Skaftafell National Park

Shooting under the bridge, Skaftafell National Park

Five shots later, the 24-105mm was on my Canon, the 15-35mm was in my pack (in one of those little lens bags). I had pulled out my poncho. Yes, there was a steady rain by now and yes, I had remembered to bring rain gear. As I walked, I returned to thinking how I could be more attentive, mindful. …

… My father used to say you always take care of your tools. Clean the paint brush you used. Put the hammer back where it came from. Basic dad stuff, basic life lessons. The early landscape photo pioneers had the same practical perspective on things, maybe that’s what made them pioneers. I started making mental notes of stuff I needed to attend to.

Stuff I need to attend to, a personal list 

  • Put the lens back where it belongs when you switch to a new one … same for ND, CPL filters, cable release, etc.
  • Put your lens cap into your left-hand pants pocket (my system) when you’re shooting.
  • Bring water.
  • Bring extra gear, poncho, windbreaker, etc., if there’s a chance you’ll need them.
  • Bring a camera cover in Iceland, you’ll need it at some point during the day.
  • Check your camera settings before you start shooting.
  • Take the location in, breathe it in, before you start shooting.
  • Keep the rest of your gear close at hand.
  • Don’t take unnecessary risks. Travel safely.
  • Don’t always stay on the path (or in the scenic overlook’s parking lot), explore.
  • Be respectful of property, ask the owner before you intrude on their land.
  • Be supportive of your fellow photographers. Don’t walk into their shot, don’t trash talk on their gear. Appreciate where they’re at, share insights. It’s a community.
  • Don’t pull the trigger until you’re seeing the composition you want.
  • Think outside the box. Try shooting at ground level, from above, with different settings.
  • Recheck settings as you go.
  • Check that your lens is clean, often.
  • Stow everything where it belongs when you’re through with that location.

These are my notes to self, your mileage will vary. I added one more note to the list when I got to Snaefellsness: Zip up your gear pack fully when it’s not in use, so that new Sigma lens won’t drop out and the UV filter won’t be destroyed. Yep.

This list is a work in progress. And I know there are a hundred other points I could have mentioned. But you can only keep so much in RAM.

 

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